The Dairy Dilemma

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The Dairy Dilemma

If you have always thought that you needed to consume three servings of dairy products a day to get adequate calcium, science now points to the strong possibility that this isn’t so. Whether it was motivated by pressure from the dairy lobby or bad science, it seems that the recommendation for 1,000 mg of calcium each day is under scientific scrutiny.

There are actually some really good reasons to take a closer look at how well your body tolerates dairy and whether it makes sense to cut down on dairy products or cut them out completely.

If you have an intolerance or allergy to dairy, you may suffer from gas, bloating, diarrhea, congestion and other symptoms after eating too much dairy-based food.

Another consideration is that industrial milk production has changed. Far from the image of a cow grazing on a farm, most dairy foods come from animals that are fed medications intended to increase milk production as well as antibiotics. There is a concern that these practices negatively influence the quality of the milk and milk-based foods that we eat.

What about bone health? Ironically, a recent study found that high levels of milk consumption intake was associated a higher incidence of bone fractures in women.

Alternative dairy-free milks, including almond milk, hemp seed milk, hazelnut milk, quinoa milk, coconut milk and rice milk, are increasingly available. If you try them, you may switch for taste, or because it’s an easy way to reduce your reliance on dairy foods.

As far as your calcium needs, dairy isn’t the only, or even the best way to get calcium from your diet. Try eating more dark green, leafy vegetables, oatmeal, white beans, dried figs, as well as nuts, seeds and legumes.

If you’d like more of this kind of easy-to-understand health and wellness advice, please subscribe to the Spatz Medical blog by filling in the subscription box in the column to the left.

Rebeca Espinoza 100x65Author: Rebeca Espinoza

Rebeca Espinoza writes about health, fitness and weight loss for Spatz Medical, makers of the Spatz3 Adjustable Gastric Balloon. You can find her on Google+ or at rebeca@spatzmedical.com.[:pt]

cows-151944_640If you have always thought that you needed to consume three servings of dairy products a day to get adequate calcium, science now points to the strong possibility that this isn’t so. Whether it was motivated by pressure from the dairy lobby or bad science, it seems that the recommendation for 1,000 mg of calcium each day is under scientific scrutiny.

There are actually some really good reasons to take a closer look at how well your body tolerates dairy and whether it makes sense to cut down on dairy products or cut them out completely.

If you have an intolerance or allergy to dairy, you may suffer from gas, bloating, diarrhea, congestion and other symptoms after eating too much dairy-based food.

Another consideration is that industrial milk production has changed. Far from the image of a cow grazing on a farm, most dairy foods come from animals that are fed medications intended to increase milk production as well as antibiotics. There is a concern that these practices negatively influence the quality of the milk and milk-based foods that we eat.

What about bone health? Ironically, a recent study found that high levels of milk consumption intake was associated a higher incidence of bone fractures in women.

Alternative dairy-free milks, including almond milk, hemp seed milk, hazelnut milk, quinoa milk, coconut milk and rice milk, are increasingly available. If you try them, you may switch for taste, or because it’s an easy way to reduce your reliance on dairy foods.

As far as your calcium needs, dairy isn’t the only, or even the best way to get calcium from your diet. Try eating more dark green, leafy vegetables, oatmeal, white beans, dried figs, as well as nuts, seeds and legumes.

Author: Rebeca Espinoza

Rebeca Espinoza writes about health, fitness and weight loss for Spatz Medical, makers of the Spatz3 Adjustable Gastric Balloon. You can find her on Google+ or at rebeca@spatzmedical.com.

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